Making the Most of Maui: Food, a Coffee Farm, and a Whole Lot of Fun

Haleakala sunrise
Haleakala sunrise

I believe it was a sidebar in Maui Revealed (a very detailed and opinionated guidebook, with a helpful app also available) where I read the warning. A local said to be careful about trying to do too much sightseeing, as it’s easy to spend too much time in a car driving around the island instead of actually relaxing and enjoying the island. Instead, he advised, strive to discover the slow joy of “island time.”

As a compulsive food writer who wants to try it all (and as a non-beachgoer), I found my schedule filling fast for my first visit to Maui. Luckily, with help from the Maui Visitors and Convention Bureau, I found compelling nature, activities, hotels and spas to provide rejuvenation and relaxation. And eventually even a dip in the ocean.

But would I find good food?

Day 1: “Racing” Down Haleakala, Eventually to Relaxation

With a 9:15pm arrival at Kahului Airport and then car rental pick-up, drive, and hotel check-in, it would be about midnight before my wife and I could catch a nap at our room at the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa. “Nap” is the key word, as the alarm would wake us only two hours later for the drive back past the airport to Paia, where we’d go to Maui Sunriders for their Sunrise Tour. Given the 3am check-in, the tour operators were smooth and successful in loading vans (people inside, bikes on top) and getting going to the summit of Haleakala at 10,023 feet.

The view from the Maui Sunriders tour
The view from the Maui Sunriders tour

Our guide gave us interesting historical and cultural information (and riding tips) en route to keep us awake at the start of the trip, and then time for some to nod off before reaching the summit. At the summit, we’d have the unique opportunity to witness the sun rise above the cloud-line. It’s a rather stunning experience, albeit a cold one even during warmer months, as it’s dark and temperatures drop low at that elevation. (Some might suggest sneaking out a hotel blanket to keep warm, especially if you’ve only brought warm weather clothes. Definitely layer up.)

As soon as the sun fully broke the clouds, it was back into the vans to reach the staging area for the bicycle departure, getting ahead of the other tour operators. Maui Sunriders offers an unguided tour, allowing riders to go at their own pace, but with desire to stay ahead of the guided tours with accompanying vans that can bottle up the road. The mountain-to-sea ride is an easy one, even if you haven’t been on a bike in years (or decades?). Just don’t call it exercise, as it’s downhill virtually all the way, and therefore more of an exercise in judiciously hitting the brakes while navigating the turns (and traffic) and admiring the views.

As our guide explained, the early tour means passing by some “sites” not yet open (a post-sunrise tour might be better for those wanting frequent visits), but not too early for the first food stop: T Komoda Store and Bakery. It’s a rather sparse store, but visitors should check out the old articles and artifacts inside for the history lesson. In some ways, T Komoda set the tone for my experience of the Maui food scene: somewhat charming and somewhat sweet. With two lunch stops planned, we didn’t want to overindulge, but we had a couple of sweets on the to-do list.

These were at the top of my to-try list at T Komoda Store and Bakery
These were at the top of my to-try list at T Komoda Store and Bakery
Also at T-Komoda: the popular stick donuts
Also at T-Komoda: the popular stick donuts

It’s far from a race down the mountain, but with relatively few stops, we made it back to the bike shop fairly quickly, turning in equipment with giving thanks for the exhilarating ride. A quick walk through Paia (including a stop at the local beach to get a first glimpse of the ocean at eye level) enabled us to get land-legs back. We stopped at Mana Foods, a fantastic store that is larger than it seems from the outside, and full of interesting prepared foods and groceries. When asking about seasonal fruit, the friendly folks offered to cut us samples of anything we wanted to try, and we eventually bought some delicious apple bananas and more as snacks the first couple of days.

Fresh fruit at Mana Foods
Fresh fruit at Mana Foods

Then it was on to Kahului for lunch. Part one would be at Da Kitchen Cafe, bustling on a Saturday. We were lucky enough to get the last table upon opening, avoiding a long wait. For me, the restaurant felt a bit too polished, but I enjoyed a first taste of loco moco and, even better, their special deep-fried Spam musubi.

Da Kitchen’s loco moco: grilled homemade 98% lean ground beef burger topped with 2 eggs, onions, mushrooms, and brown gravy. With the compulsory two scoops of rice, we opted for green salad instead of potato-macaroni salad. Overall, this plate was just okay.
Da Kitchen’s loco moco: grilled homemade 98% lean ground beef burger topped with 2
eggs, onions, mushrooms, and brown gravy. With the compulsory two scoops of rice, we opted for green salad instead of potato-macaroni salad. Overall, this plate was just okay.
Fried spam musubi at Da Kitchen (better than the loco moco!)
Fried spam musubi at Da Kitchen (better than the loco moco!)

From Da Kitchen, we headed to the harbor with hope of finding the Geste Shrimp Truck—but felt devastated when it wasn’t there. It would be our only chance to try the truck, so after waiting past the expected arrival time, we drove to the nearby flea market to poke around and do reconnaissance. Here we were reminded about island time and encouraged to go back. And there it was—with a line. We gladly waited, and the shrimp would turn out to be one of the best bites of the trip.

The Geste shrimp truck
The Geste shrimp truck
A delicious order of shrimp at Geste (worth the wait!), this time with crab salad and just one (enough!) scoop of rice
A delicious order of shrimp at Geste (worth the wait!), this time with crab salad and just one (enough!) scoop of rice

After the two-part lunch, we drove back to the Hyatt, getting our first daylight look at the views along the way. The view from the hotel room tempted us to linger, but rest would be just down the road, as we had a spa appointment at Spa Montage at the Montage Kapalua Bay. This resort is less than 20 minutes up the road from the Hyatt, and we got there so quickly that we had time to see the nearby Dragon’s Teeth rock formation at Makalua-puna Point. It’s a gorgeous sight, and a nice place to enjoy the breeze and admire the power of the water.

Dragon’s Teeth rock formation at Kapalua
Dragon’s Teeth rock formation at Kapalua

At the spa, staff greeted us warmly for our Outdoor Couples Massage treatment. Following intake and selection of desired massage oil, we headed to our separate locker rooms, though each “room” was actually a paradise that included a eucalyptus steam room, cedar wood sauna, cascading whirlpool, and bamboo rainfall shower. After enjoying these amenities, my wife and I met up for refreshing beverages before being escorted to the outdoor treatment room, where we enjoyed side-by-side massages as a cooling breeze passed through the area.

Montage Kapalua Bay from afar (photo courtesy of Montage Kapalua Bay)
Montage Kapalua Bay from afar (photo courtesy of Montage Kapalua Bay)
Spa Montage lobby (photo courtesy of Montage Kapalua Bay)
Spa Montage lobby (photo courtesy of Montage Kapalua Bay)
Tranquil outdoor room at Spa Montage (photo courtesy of Montage Kapalua Bay)
Tranquil outdoor room at Spa Montage (photo courtesy of Montage Kapalua Bay)

Following the treatment, it was just a short stroll to the resort’s Cane & Canoe restaurant. With Kapalua Bay as the backdrop, I relaxed and realized the appeal of outdoor dining in the warm climate. The restaurant architecture is reminiscent of a traditional Hawaiian canoe house, with a guitarist playing mellow versions of classics with Hawaiian interpretations. Cane & Canoe provides higher-end preparations of local ingredients, and while we enjoyed our appetizers and entrees, it would be a side dish of corn that proved most memorable.

Hamachi poke with caviar, avocado, and fingerling potato chips at Cane & Canoe
Hamachi poke with caviar, avocado, and fingerling potato chips at Cane & Canoe
Cane & Canoe’s calamari “chow fun” is indeed fun, with the “noodles” made from squid, and accompanied by lap cheong sausage, bean sprouts, charred scallions, chili flake, and kale. Nice flavors!
Cane & Canoe’s calamari “chow fun” is indeed fun, with the “noodles” made from squid, and accompanied by lap cheong sausage, bean sprouts, charred scallions, chili flake, and kale. Nice flavors!
Tempura ahi tuna with shimeji mushrooms, foie gras nage, asparagus, and smohered greens
Tempura ahi tuna with shimeji mushrooms, foie gras nage, asparagus, and smohered greens
Kona kampachi with aromatic rice, hearts of palm, fresh green curry, and grapefruit-yuzu gel
Kona kampachi with aromatic rice, hearts of palm, fresh green curry, and grapefruit-yuzu gel
Kula corn with chili pepper and cotija cheese. My favorite dish at Cane & Canoe for its local freshness and great flavors (naturally sweet, then spiked with a little heat and salty, savory delight from the cheese).
Kula corn with chili pepper and cotija cheese. My favorite dish at Cane & Canoe for its local freshness and great flavors (naturally sweet, then spiked with a little heat and salty, savory delight from the cheese).
View of Cane & Canoe (photo courtesy of Montage Kapalua Bay)
View of Cane & Canoe (photo courtesy of Montage Kapalua Bay)

Day 2: “Racing” the Road to Hana in Time to Enjoy the Hyatt

The Road to Hana comes with many choices. Drive full-circle or turn back at Hana? What time to start, given factors of traffic, opening times, and light for photography? Exactly where to stop?

On the Road to Hana
On the Road to Hana

We decided to start early, make just a few stops on the way to Hana, and then turn back and make any desired additional stops. The early start enabled us to avoid traffic and not feel rushed (as we had evening plans back at the hotel), and turning back gave us flexibility to hit things we missed on the first half of the drive.

Before hitting the Road to Hana, we stopped at the Port Town Chevron in Kahului. I’d heard that this place has good food (for breakfast and road snacks), but upon arrival we found out that options are limited on Sundays. No bento, but still a variety of musubi (tuna, fried rice and spam, lunchmeat and egg, teri-beef and spicy chicken), some uniquely wrapped entirely in nori.

Musubi from Port Town Chevron
Musubi from Port Town Chevron

It’s hard to do justice to the Road to Hana in writing. I can tell you that there are waterfalls and lush greenery and gorgeous flowers and cliffs that plunge to the sea and much more. The trip is really what you make of it, and your itinerary should reflect your interests. Our drive started a bit rainy (the only rain we’d see during our time in Maui), but the skies eventually cleared. Our first stop was in Haiku at Aunty Sandy’s for banana bread (somewhat charming and somewhat sweet) and a look around KeAnae Point.

Aunty Sandy’s banana bread
Aunty Sandy’s banana bread

Our major stop would be at Wai’anapanapa State Park, just before reaching Hana. We spent a considerable amount of time here checking out Black Sand Beach, the blowholes, the sea arches, and the hiking trails. Later we’d reach Hana and scramble along the shore for a glimpse of Red Sand Beach on Kaihalulu Bay. With few lunch options, signs for Huli Huli chicken lured us just past Hana to Koki Beach for a meal with musical accompaniment.

Scene from the hike at Wai’anapanapa State Park
Scene from the hike at Wai’anapanapa State Park
Just past Hana, preparing Huli Huli chicken
Just past Hana, preparing Huli Huli chicken
Food and fun (and more scoops of rice) at our Huli Huli chicken stop
Food and fun (and more scoops of rice) at our Huli Huli chicken stop
How can I resist a photo of sea turtles at Ho’okipa Beach Park in Paia?
How can I resist a photo of sea turtles at Ho’okipa Beach Park in Paia?

We knew we were missing some of the more spectacular sights past Hana, but satisfied, we enjoyed the return ride with views from the opposite direction. And we were happy to have some of the afternoon to relax and explore the grounds at the Hyatt. The 750,000-gallon pool has a 150-food lava tube water slide. There are six tennis courts and two 18-hold championship golf courses. And you can even take a wildlife tour to learn about the many exotic birds on the grounds, including South African penguins, macaws, flamingos, and African crowned cranes.

Aerial view of the Hyatt property (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)
Aerial view of the Hyatt property (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)
Lobby entrance to the Hyatt (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)
Lobby entrance to the Hyatt (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)
The big pool at the Hyatt (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)
The big pool at the Hyatt (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)

Our exploration necessitated a stop at the convenient Ululani’s Hawaiian Shave Ice stand by the pool. Shave ice in the heat of the Hawaiian sun is a good thing.

Ululani’s stand at the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa
Ululani’s stand at the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa
Choose from the favorite combinations or design your own shave ice from a long list of flavors at Ululani’s. We chose No Ka Oi with coconut, mango, and liliko’i, then added mochi pieces for texture and a sprinkling (not pictured) of li hing mui powder (pickled plum skin) for tartness. Ice cream below the shave ice makes this a rich and refreshing snack.
Choose from the favorite combinations or design your own shave ice from a long list of flavors at Ululani’s. We chose No Ka Oi with coconut, mango, and liliko’i, then added mochi pieces for texture and a sprinkling (not pictured) of li hing mui powder (pickled plum skin) for tartness. Ice cream below the shave ice makes this a rich and refreshing snack.

After taking in the captivating sunset, it was time for dinner at Japengo, right on the grounds of the hotel. I was admittedly a bit leery of the mini-chain, but pleasantly surprised with the meal. The indoor/outdoor patio sports gorgeous views (this has already become a recurring dinner theme!), and there’s a sushi bar for those who prefer that type of seating. On that note, we ate a requisite crazy roll; everything, while sometimes on the sweet side, was well-executed, and I especially enjoyed the chow fun.

Baked scallops on the half shell with tobiko mayo, shichimi sea salt, and ogo seaweed at Japengo
Baked scallops on the half shell with tobiko mayo, shichimi sea salt, and ogo seaweed at Japengo
Japengo’s prawn and mango salad with Kula baby greens, palm sugar vinaigrette mint, and macadamia nuts (sweet but tasty)
Japengo’s prawn and mango salad with Kula baby greens, palm sugar vinaigrette
mint, and macadamia nuts (sweet but tasty)
Sashimi-style hamachi and watermelon with sriracha tempura bits, tobiko, lychee pearls, and emperor’s ponzu at Japengo
Sashimi-style hamachi and watermelon with sriracha tempura bits, tobiko, lychee pearls, and emperor’s ponzu at Japengo
A requisite roll at Japengo: this blackened ahi roll has crab, avocado, and cucumber on the inside and blackened ahi, spicy mayo, Maui onion, ponzu, and wasabi tobiko on the outside
A requisite roll at Japengo: this blackened ahi roll has crab, avocado, and cucumber on the inside and blackened ahi, spicy mayo, Maui onion, ponzu, and wasabi tobiko on the outside
I like the ability to order a number of half-portions at Japengo. Less commitment, more variety. Here: a half portion of grilled local mahi mahi with young coconut salad, lemongrass beurre blanc, and forbidden rice.
I like the ability to order a number of half-portions at Japengo. Less commitment, more variety. Here: a half portion of grilled local mahi mahi with young coconut salad, lemongrass beurre blanc, and forbidden rice.
Better than the mahi mahi, and my favorite dish at Japengo, was this half-portion of China Town chow fun with char siu pork, day boat scallops, crab, Kaua’i shrimp, oyster sauce, and mushroom shoyu. Really delicious, making for two straight days of terrific chow fun!
Better than the mahi mahi, and my favorite dish at Japengo, was this half-portion of China Town chow fun with char siu pork, day boat scallops, crab, Kaua’i shrimp, oyster sauce, and mushroom shoyu. Really delicious, making for two straight days of terrific chow fun!
The dining scene at Japengo (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)
The dining scene at Japengo (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)
Sunset at the Hyatt
Sunset at the Hyatt

One of the unique activities to do at the Hyatt is the “Tour of the Stars.” You’re headed to the roof (be forewarned: some may say otherwise, but you’ll likely want a light sweater or jacket) to take advantage of dark skies and a variety of telescopes, including one that’s computerized and quite high-powered. An astronomical expert is on hand to set the scopes to stars, planets, and galaxies, providing a science lesson that’s actually fun. There’s even a couples-only Romance Tour that includes champagne and chocolate-covered strawberries. It’s an enlightening way to end an evening.

Terrific telescope viewing as part of the Hyatt’s “Tour of the Stars” (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)
Terrific telescope viewing as part of the Hyatt’s “Tour of the Stars” (photo courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa)

Day 3: Ka’anapali to Wailea (Noodles, Poke, and a Tasting Menu)

Finally, an unrushed morning, though time to pack as it was moving day from West Maui to South Maui. And with that, a realization that with all the rushing around, we’d yet to see Lahaina.

The day started at Aloha Mixed Plate, with a friendly vibe and a patio meant for lounging over a slow breakfast. Mixed results on the order: much better loco moco than at Da Kitchen, but disappointment with the saimin. To be fair, as a ramen lover, I’m guessing this has to do more with the dish than the specific preparation at this restaurant. My sense is that saimin generally lacks the richness of ramen that I truly love.

Aloha Mixed Plate’s loco moco tops what we ate at Da Kitchen. This one is a fried rice version, with an egg and of course a smothering of gravy.
Aloha Mixed Plate’s loco moco tops what we ate at Da Kitchen. This one is a fried rice version, with an egg and of course a smothering of gravy.
Saimin at Aloha Mixed Plate. I was excited to have Asian noodles for breakfast, but this was somewhat bland.
Saimin at Aloha Mixed Plate. I was excited to have Asian noodles for breakfast, but this was somewhat bland.

From there, we enjoyed a stroll through Lahaina. We found some food gifts at one of the supermarkets, and more at one of the tourist-oriented souvenir stores. Our primary destination, though, was the famed banyan tree, a marvel at over 60 feet high and over 150 years old.

Behold the Banyan tree!
Behold the Banyan tree!

This noodle lover really looked forward to lunch at Star Noodle, made famous by chef Sheldon Simeon, who was one of the contestants in the Seattle season of Bravo’s Top Chef. The restaurant’s food really reflects my style, with interesting ingredient combinations and bold flavors. This lunch was probably the best meal of my time in Maui, from the pohole salad to the poke and crudo to the two interesting noodle dishes.

I loved this pohole salad at Star Noodle: fiddlehead ferns from Hana, Maui onion, shrimp, and kombu. Great start to the meal!
I loved this pohole salad at Star Noodle: fiddlehead ferns from Hana, Maui onion, shrimp, and kombu. Great start to the meal!
Star Noodle’s ahi avo: ahi and avocado with lemon-pressed olive oil sambal, and usukuchi
Star Noodle’s ahi avo: ahi and avocado with lemon-pressed olive oil sambal, and usukuchi
A treat from the Star Noodle kitchen: hamachi crudo with cucumber relish and yuzu ponzu, plus lemon avocado and Korean pepper on the side
A treat from the Star Noodle kitchen: hamachi crudo with cucumber relish and yuzu ponzu, plus lemon avocado and Korean pepper on the side
An interesting dish for this noodle lover: Star Noodle’s “look moore funn” with rolled noodles (made with cake flour and tapioca starch), black bean clam sauce, choi sum, and chili oil. I enjoyed the bold flavors.
An interesting dish for this noodle lover: Star Noodle’s “look moore funn” with rolled noodles (made with cake flour and tapioca starch), black bean clam sauce, choi sum, and chili oil. I enjoyed the bold flavors.
I simply had to try Star Noodle’s Hapa ramen (I believe the name refers to its 8 ingredients) with rich pork broth, roast pork, poached egg, choi sum, kamaboko, bamboo shoots, mayu (black toasted sesame and roasted garlic), and aka miso (miso with Hawaiian chili). The broth is made from kalua pork carcasses from a sister restaurant’s luaus.) Pretty good, and I enjoyed the smoky flavor. But I still looked forward to better ramen in the days ahead in Tokyo.
I simply had to try Star Noodle’s Hapa ramen (I believe the name refers to its 8 ingredients) with rich pork broth, roast pork, poached egg, choi sum, kamaboko, bamboo shoots, mayu (black toasted sesame and roasted garlic), and aka miso (miso with Hawaiian chili). The broth is made from kalua pork carcasses from a sister restaurant’s luaus.) Pretty good, and I enjoyed the smoky flavor. But I still looked forward to better ramen in the days ahead in Tokyo.
Twist my arm: “forced” to try a sample of malasadas with chocolate and butterscotch caramel sauces, plus peanuts. Decadent and delicious.
Twist my arm: “forced” to try a sample of malasadas with chocolate and butterscotch caramel sauces, plus peanuts. Decadent and delicious.
Recommended!
Recommended!

As long as you’re at Star Noodle, you should stop in at the local Tamura’s Fine Wine & Liquors, just a stone’s throw away. You won’t be alone if, like me, you’re not there for the alcohol, but instead for the poke. Tamura’s has a surprisingly large selection of poke, and the workers are generous in providing samples of anything you’d like to taste.

Nice selection of poke from Tamura’s Fine Wine & Liquors
Nice selection of poke from Tamura’s Fine Wine & Liquors
Some ahi shoyu with sea asparagus (or what some call sea beans) to enjoy at a scenic viewpoint down the road
Some ahi shoyu with sea asparagus (or what some call sea beans) to enjoy at a scenic viewpoint down the road

After a 45-minute drive, we arrived at the Fairmont Kea Lani and were immediately in awe of the resort. The lobby, the service, the suite, and the immense balcony were all breathtaking. We couldn’t wait to have time to take it all in.

But, first, a highly anticipated visit to the Grand Wailea Resort for a spa treatment and dinner. “Grande” is an appropriate word for the Spa Grande, the largest spa in Hawaii with 40 treatment rooms in a 50,000 square foot space. It’s most known for its Terme Hydrotherapy Circuit, “a unique haven of water therapies featuring a Roman tub, saunas, cascading waterfalls, Swiss jet showers, a Japanese furo and five specialty baths.” Note that there’s one such circuit on each side of the spa (!), as they’re single-gender only.

It’s actually a little overwhelming at first, but one of the attendants will walk you through the process with bathing circuit suggestions. That person will also summon you for your full-body loofah scrub, and then let you know when it’s time to head for your actual treatment. You have an hour in water paradise before your treatment, so it’s important to budget your time accordingly. Most captivating to me were the colorful salt baths; while you soak, an information sheet lets you learn more about the benefits of each type of salt.

Inside Spa Grande at the Grand Wailea (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Inside Spa Grande at the Grand Wailea (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Hawaiian Salt Baths at Spa Grande (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Hawaiian Salt Baths at Spa Grande (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Spa Grande’s lanai (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Spa Grande’s lanai (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)

As at Spa Montage, I rendezvoused with my wife in a common area, and then our massage therapists led us to a treatment room for our lomi lomi massages. This traditional Hawaiian-style massage uses a lot of forearm and elbow movement to deploy medium pressure. Soothing and relaxing!

After the relaxing treatment, we navigated our way through the enormous property for dinner at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a. Much to our surprise and delight, the restaurant treated us to a semi-secluded huge table on a deck jutting out on the water. The atmosphere was extremely romantic, and the chef sent out a tasting menu of dishes. We were there to simply relax, eat, and relish. As eating is done with all the senses, I wish I could have seen the food as part of the experience (only by touching up the photos do I get an idea of how it all looked), but we enjoyed the seafood-heavy meal regardless. Stuffed, I was tempted to snooze in the chair, but we took the short walk along the water back to our hotel.

Wow! That little bump-out is where we enjoyed dinner at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Wow! That little bump-out is where we enjoyed dinner at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Another view of Humuhumunukunukuapua’a (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Another view of Humuhumunukunukuapua’a (photo courtesy of Grand Wailea)
Amuse bouche to start tasting menu at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a: salmon with yuzu, Hawaiian chili, celery ginger shaved ice
Amuse bouche to start tasting menu at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a: salmon with yuzu, Hawaiian chili, celery ginger shaved ice
Humuhumunukunukuapua’a’s Haiku tomato three ways: whole marinated, spicy jam, emulsion
Humuhumunukunukuapua’a’s Haiku tomato three ways: whole marinated, spicy jam, emulsion
Seared day boat scallop with crispy potato cake, petit pois, truffle, and yuzu at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a
Seared day boat scallop with crispy potato cake, petit pois, truffle, and yuzu at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a
Really enjoyed this Surfing Goat Dairy cheese and watermelon with prosciutto crackling, red wine & rose gastrique, and edible blossoms at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a
Really enjoyed this Surfing Goat Dairy cheese and watermelon with prosciutto crackling, red wine & rose gastrique, and edible blossoms at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a
Crispy mahi mahi with forbidden rice, baby bok choy, and sauce I’lommedieu at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a (nicely cooked, but at this point I was tired of mahi mahi and forbidden rice)
Crispy mahi mahi with forbidden rice, baby bok choy, and sauce I’lommedieu at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a (nicely cooked, but at this point I was tired of mahi mahi and forbidden rice)
Dessert at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a was this Chocolate Peanut ‘Auka Kula (Gold Bar): “peanut butter crispy and milk chocolate custard, candied nuts, crème fraiche sorbet and a touch of gold leaf”
Dessert at Humuhumunukunukuapua’a was this Chocolate Peanut ‘Auka Kula (Gold Bar):
“peanut butter crispy and milk chocolate custard, candied nuts, crème fraiche sorbet and a touch of gold leaf”

Day 4: Early Morning Coffee (Farm), a Mango, and a Final Day at the Fairmont

The fourth and final day, I woke up early to go to Upcountry Maui to visit O’o Farm. This farm has a mission of sustainability and biodynamic cultivation, providing product for its local restaurants. There’s a general farm tour, but I was excited to be part of the coffee tour. Hawaii is the only state in the United States with the ability to grow coffee beans (it’s got the right elevation, temperatures, etc.), and O’o Farm is quite special in offering a bean to cup (or, rather, a “seed to cup”) experience.

The thermometer reading in my car plummeted as I drove from sea level up to the farm, with the cool air quite refreshing. At O’o, farm manager Richard Clark greeting the assembled group and walked us through the coffee trees, explaining the growing and harvesting process, and fielding questions from general to geeky. (The tour also provides some insight into the overall workings of the farm.) Soon it would be time for breakfast, which the on-site chef prepared in the outdoor kitchen using as many farm products as possible, yielding scones, salad, quiche, and of course coffee (French press).

O’o Farm manager Richard Clark teaching about growing coffee
O’o Farm manager Richard Clark teaching about growing coffee
A closer look at the beans at O’o Farm
A closer look at the beans at O’o Farm
Breakfast at O’o Farm: quiche, salad, and a scone
Breakfast at O’o Farm: quiche, salad, and a scone
Outdoor kitchen at O’o Farm
Outdoor kitchen at O’o Farm

After breakfast, the tour continued and reached its conclusion at the coffee “shop” where we learned more about the beans and the roasting process. Clark then played barista in providing samples of pour-over coffee and then pulled shots of espresso, with steamed milk available for those (how dare they!) who preferred lattes. While I’m not a big fan of Hawaiian coffees, the tour was truly a unique and informative experience, and I really appreciate the farm’s mission.

O’o Farm bean sizer
O’o Farm bean sizer
Clark working on his pour-over technique
Clark working on his pour-over technique
A look at the roasting machinery and espresso bar at O’o Farm
A look at the roasting machinery and espresso bar at O’o Farm
Clark pulling espresso
Clark pulling espresso
O’o Farm’s coffee
O’o Farm’s coffee

While Upcountry, food lovers will find opportunities to visit a lavender farm, goat farm (with goat cheese samplings), a winery (pineapple wine, anyone?), and more. While I made a stop at Kula Country Farms to buy some strawberries (u-pick is also available), I was anxious to get back to the hotel to enjoy the Fairmont for the final half-day of my Maui stay. En route, though, I had to make two stops in Kihei.

Selection at Kula Country Farms
Selection at Kula Country Farms

One would be at Eskimo Candy for some poke to go. Business was bustling at this popular eatery. We would soon enjoy the poke on that enormous balcony of our room at the Fairmont.

Poke from Eskimo Candy
Poke from Eskimo Candy

The other stop, highly anticipated, was Yee’s Orchard & Fruit Stand. Friends in Seattle raved about the mangos, so this was the must-try. (I got great bananas here as well.) Everyone talks about the Goldenglows being the best, but the vendor encouraged me to try the Alimomis, which I actually liked better. Oh, the Goldenglows were truly sweet, but there was something extra special about the Alimomis—perhaps the depth of flavor.

Display at Yee’s Orchard & Fruit Stand
Display at Yee’s Orchard & Fruit Stand
Alimomi mangos from Yee’s Orchard were a highlight of the trip to Maui
Alimomi mangos from Yee’s Orchard were a highlight of the trip to Maui

In the afterglow of the Goldenglows and Alimomis (that’s so fun to say aloud), I was quite content to sit on the balcony and enjoy the view, but my wife said, “You brought your swimsuit, so you really must get into the water.” As she had earlier that morning seen one of the “Seinfeld Four” (this after enjoying complimentary use of snorkel gear and seeing the amazing underwater world), this tempted me to mill about the people. And, yes, to finally enjoy the beach chairs and, indeed, the ocean. Part of the paradise at the Fairmont Kea Lani.

View of the Fairmont Kea Lani (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
View of the Fairmont Kea Lani (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Lobby at the Fairmont (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Lobby at the Fairmont (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Inside a Fairmont suite (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Inside a Fairmont suite (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Pool at the Fairmont (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Pool at the Fairmont (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Fairmont beach chairs at Polo Beach (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Fairmont beach chairs at Polo Beach (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Aerial view of the Fairmont (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Aerial view of the Fairmont (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Morning view from my suite at the Fairmont…
Morning view from my suite at the Fairmont…
…and sunset at the Fairmont
…and sunset at the Fairmont

Late afternoon, we did leave the hotel for happy hour at Migrant, which is where Sheldon Simeon is now in the kitchen. With dinner to follow, we sampled four dishes, finding some familiar and favorite flavors. All were delicious, with the hanger steak most memorable. If I had to spend extensive time in Maui, I’m sure that Star Noodle and Migrant would be my most frequented restaurants.

Migrant’s hibachi hanger steak with Migrant spice rub, Vietnamese nouc cham sauce, quick pickled shallots, and Upland cress. I enjoyed the cut of meat, and the flavors.
Migrant’s hibachi hanger steak with Migrant spice rub, Vietnamese nouc cham sauce, quick pickled shallots, and Upland cress. I enjoyed the cut of meat, and the flavors.
Migrant’s KFC Chicken and Waffles: Hawaiian vodka-battered Korean fried chicken wings, Belgian waffles, umami butter, and roasted kim chee peanuts
Migrant’s KFC Chicken and Waffles: Hawaiian vodka-battered Korean fried chicken wings, Belgian waffles, umami butter, and roasted kim chee peanuts
I thought we ordered the “Ay Kudesh! Garlic Noodles” (pan-fried Iwamoto saimin noodles, insanely spicy Hawaiian chili pepper sambal, garlic three ways, and garlic chives), but this may have been the less spicy version. Still, a delicious dish with lots of layers of garlic.
I thought we ordered the “Ay Kudesh! Garlic Noodles” (pan-fried Iwamoto saimin noodles, insanely spicy Hawaiian chili pepper sambal, garlic three ways, and garlic chives), but this may have been the less spicy version. Still, a delicious dish with lots of layers of garlic.
I love a restaurant that names a dish “Bottom of the plate lunch” (and uses the word “schmaltz”). At Migrant, this is shaved Kula head cabbage, rendered ribeye schmaltz, and warm kalbi dressing.
I love a restaurant that names a dish “Bottom of the plate lunch” (and uses the word “schmaltz”). At Migrant, this is shaved Kula head cabbage, rendered ribeye schmaltz, and warm kalbi dressing.

Following happy hour, we slowly strolled the Wailea Coastal Walk back to the Fairmont, eventually settling in for dinner at Ko restaurant, which offers “cuisine inspired by the sugarcane plantation era.” This would be another open-air affair with a (very) friendly server, who helped us navigate an entrée menu that includes sections called “Makai Catch,” “Plantation Traditions,” and “Ko Specialties.” We enjoyed our starters before starting to succumb to full stomachs as the entrees arrived—with the zarzuela better than the Makai Catch. As I ate the dessert sampler, I thought that as with previous meals, the experience was charming and sweet.

View of the Fairmont’s Ko restaurant from the pool (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
View of the Fairmont’s Ko restaurant from the pool (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Dining area at Ko restaurant (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Dining area at Ko restaurant (photo courtesy of the Fairmont Kea Lani)
Bread service at Ko restaurant
Bread service at Ko restaurant
Ko’s Kobe beef poke seared with Hawaiian steak rub, cucumber, tomato, and Maui onion. This was my favorite dish of the meal, as the beef was tender and tasty.
Ko’s Kobe beef poke seared with Hawaiian steak rub, cucumber, tomato, and Maui onion. This was my favorite dish of the meal, as the beef was tender and tasty.
Ko’s Tangled Tiger Prawns: shredded phyllo-wrapped tiger prawns, Kula greens, pineapple sweet chili garlic sauce and macadamia nuts
Ko’s Tangled Tiger Prawns: shredded phyllo-wrapped tiger prawns, Kula greens, pineapple sweet chili garlic sauce and macadamia nuts
Ko’s zarzuela: a kettle of lobster, shrimp, scallops, mussels, clams, and chorizo simmered in rich saffron broth
Ko’s zarzuela: a kettle of lobster, shrimp, scallops, mussels, clams, and chorizo simmered in rich saffron broth
For the Makai Catch, I chose the macadamia nut crust preparation with tomato-ginger butter and mashed Molokai sweet potatoes
For the Makai Catch, I chose the macadamia nut crust preparation with tomato-ginger butter and mashed Molokai sweet potatoes
Stuffed, but the Ko kitchen sent out a platter of their Ohana-style signature desserts. Pretty plate, with the Kula strawberry gelato being about as much as we could manage!
Stuffed, but the Ko kitchen sent out a platter of their Ohana-style signature desserts. Pretty plate, with the Kula strawberry gelato being about as much as we could manage!

Thinking back on the Ko meal and my difficult decision-making about which Makai Catch preparation to try, I realize I probably should have trusted my instincts in getting the “Ginger Steamed” option with its relative simplicity, plus all of its Asian flavors. Instead, I tried to go “local” in selecting the “Macadamia Nut Crust.” Unfortunately, this hid the flavor of the fish, and the accompanying mashed Molokai sweet potatoes made the whole dish a little too sweet (albeit prettily purple!).

My time in Maui reminded of my time in Ireland many years ago. There’s a bounty of excellent product, especially seafood in the surrounding waters and agricultural products from the areas of fertile land. It’s simply about preparation. Ireland was changing when I was there, going beyond fried fish to some finer dining preparations. Maui’s a sweet place to visit, but I’d like the food to be less sweet. Or, I should say, naturally sweet, like that memorable Kula corn at Cane & Canoe, or the mangos from Yee’s Orchard. There’s wonderful potential for food in this fantastic place to visit.

Thanks to the Maui Visitors and Convention Bureau and its hotel, restaurant, spa, and attraction members for hosting or partially hosting me in Maui.

A Pleasing Pig Roast Dinner at Bell + Whete

Bell & Whete pig head For some, the sight of a pig head on a street corner causes trepidation. For me, it creates salivation.

To be fair, the pig head I saw at 2nd and Bell didn’t surprise me, as the restaurant on that very street corner had invited me in to try their weekly pig roast dinner platter. Each Sunday evening, Bell + Whete fires up the above ground Caja China (a coal-operated metal roasting box) around lunchtime to have a Heritage Meats pig ready for dinner service. They leave the pig head out on the box for giggles and gigs. (Bell + Whete can cater your home or office party in similar fashion.)

For $24 each, diners get a plate of mixed pulled pork meat, cracklings, citrus chili garlic drippings, a seasonal vegetable, a starch or grain side dish, and housemade bannock bread—which some use to make simulated tacos. On this particular day, the sides were a farro and lentil pilaf, Moroccan-spiced summer squash salad with yogurt, and a smear of harissa.

Pig roast platter (for two)
Pig roast platter (for two)

Personally, I’d prefer a sampling of different pig parts, but I understand that would create quite a logistical issue. The mixed pork was incredibly moist, such that the drippings weren’t necessary—but liquid pig only made dinner more decadent. The cracklings were terrific (especially if you break them into small pieces if you’re making the aforementioned “tacos”), and the Middle Eastern-influenced sides had nice flavors. Harissa’s always a winner for me.

Chilled Ocean Snacks
Chilled Ocean Snacks

Bell + Whete boasts a menu of 60 beers. I paired my pig with Backwoods’ Copperline Amber, though what I enjoyed even more was the Lagunitas CitruSinensis with its distinct blood orange flavor. I savored this while nibbling on an order of “Chilled Ocean Snacks.” At $28, the seafood comes in at a higher price than the pig platter, but with a pretty presentation, and the Kusshi oysters the king of this particular plate.

‘Terminator: Genisys’ is a Masterpiece…Not

If, like a lot of genre fans and straight-up geeks, you revere the first two Terminator movies, it’s a strong bet you’ll dislike Terminator: Genisys, the fifth film in the Terminator franchise (it just opened today on a metric crap-ton of screens). And if you don’t give a proverbial rat’s ass about the film series that made Teutonic cyborgs and the one-liners they spout an indelible pop culture fixture, it’s a strong bet your already-low expectations will still take a nosedive.

Let’s amend that. Hatred should be reserved for something that’s at least vigorous enough to arouse a polarizing extreme reaction of some kind. Terminator: Genisys, by contrast, runs its course with such rote apathy, it makes that ‘samba’ rhythm setting on an old Casio keyboard sound like gritty, to-the-bone Delta blues.

The movie’s opening minutes essentially replicate the 1984 original’s setup, in case anyone needs the catch-up. It’s the post-apocalyptic future, and the Earth’s ruled by Skynet, an implacable computer network whose army of machines have all but crushed mankind. John Connor, leader of the last ragtag vestiges of the human resistance, sends one of his lieutenants, Kyle Reese, back in time to protect Connor’s mom Sarah and to—ideally—destroy Skynet before it’s created.

The world Reese slingshots back to, though, doesn’t quite skew to expectations. The Sarah Connor now occupying the year 1984 isn’t a victimized, uncomprehending normal mortal: She’s a fully locked-and-loaded badass who’s already been on the run for years from Skynet’s Terminator cyborgs, her only companion being a benevolent Terminator (Arnold Schwarzenegger) who’s become her de facto father figure and protector. From there, it’s up to Sarah, Reese, and ‘Pops’ Terminator to hopscotch across time to save the world.

In a bit of irony surely not intended by its makers, Terminator: Genisys plays like a Skynet computer simulation of the first two movies. That lingering feeling’s telegraphed almost from the get-go. Virtually shot-by-shot recreations of the 1984 original drive the early portion of the movie, only with every trace of the first Terminator’s visceral, grubby immediacy antiseptically smoothed out.

Along the way, plenty of Big Action Special Effects setpieces surface: A T-1000 played by Korean actor Byung-hun Lee gets all liquid-metal stabby and smashy. Numerous cars pursue each other and crash with numbing regularity. There’s a big helicopter chase, and the apparently required-by-blockbuster-law trashing of the Golden Gate Bridge occurs twice, sorta (only the 1950s Tokyo of the Godzilla movies has been abused as relentlessly by filmmakers). It’s all bigger, louder, and explodier than any of the preceding movies, but there’s precious little inspiration or soul inside the threadbare screenplay. Yeah, picking on a summer popcorn blockbuster is like lifting a Tootsie Pop from a 4-year-old, but Mad Max Fury Road proved that an action movie can be as smart and resonant as it is exhilarating. The stakes on this type of movie have been raised, and as a result Terminator: Genisys feels like a factory job through and through.

He's old, but nowhere near as obsolete as the script.
He’s old, but nowhere near as obsolete as the script.

Most of the human components in Terminator: Genisys just amplify the movie’s sense of mechanical indifference. There’s a feral intensity in the eyes of Michael Biehn, the original film’s Kyle Reese, that clearly betrayed the frayed edges of someone who’d spent their entire life fighting and running. The Kyle Reese of Terminator: Genisys is blandly acted by Jai Courtney, whose straight-arrow earnestness runs totally at odds with his guerrilla resistance fighter character (has this guy ever experienced anything worse than maybe losing his starting place on his high school football team?). And the grunting, earthy, no-bull Sarah Connor represented by Terminator 2’s Linda Hamilton has been replaced by Game of Thrones’ Emilia Clarke, who looks like a more superficially-pretty computer sim of Hamilton and acts like a CW TV version of a living, breathing Female Action Hero. The attempted chemistry between these two feels clunky and rushed, as though director Alan Taylor couldn’t wait to get past the mushy stuff and straight to the explodey bits.

Not surprisingly, the only figures in this movie possessing staying power beyond a wet napkin are the old guys. Character actor J.K. Simmons lends rumpled believability and charm to his role as a cop whose path intersects with the Terminator twice in three decades. And Schwarzenegger proves to be pretty damned terrific. His features weathered to bracing distinction, he plays Sarah’s guardian as equal parts Pinocchio and protective papa. His awkward reconciliation of paternal love and conventional human behavior with his programming comes agonizingly close to giving this big, loud, explode-y assembly-line movie something resembling a heart.

Emotional ‘Encore': PNB Bids Farewell to Carla Körbes and Kiyon Gaines

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On Sunday, June 7, at  Pacific Northwest Ballet’s Season Encore program, a near-capacity audience bid farewell to six dancers, among them the ever-popular Kiyon Gaines, who will join the PNB School faculty after fourteen years in the company, and ballerina Carla Körbes, who in her ten years here has been one of the company’s brightest stars.

Each year she has refined details of movement more than one could think possible, so that a single arm movement can be like a flower unfolding, a foot lands feather-light after a leap which makes her seem only as weighty as that feather, her head bending gracefully to continue the movement of her body or to convey an emotion with delicacy.

All of this was evident Sunday as she danced with her frequent partner Karel Cruz an excerpt from the “Diamonds” section of Balanchine’s Jewels. It’s a partnership which has come into its own the past year or so, the long, lithe Cruz the perfect balance to her radiance. The two were also a joy to watch in the lead on the program‘s final work, Balanchine’s Serenade.

Seeing Serenade from the first tier allows one to marvel at how Balanchine used the corps and the stage to design beautiful patterns like a constantly changing kaleidoscope, all the women in the same bluish-white romantic tutus, the few men in the same color. This piece is all about the corps, and it seemed right to celebrate them as they danced with discipline—essential in this—and as superbly as ever.

Before this however, Körbes danced a solo work, Jessica Lang’s The Calling. A PNB premiere, it could have been created for her. It took place within a pool of light as she stood, her white skirt spread out widely like a morning glory flower around her. She could have been the stem of the flower, moving on the vine. It’s an unusual and lovely work requiring a dancer who can portray much feeling with just the upper body.

Serenade came at the end of the program, but earlier the audience had the chance to see each of the retirees in a solo role, Raphael Bouchard in Andrew Bartee’s Dirty Goods and Forsythe’s The Vertiginous Thrill of Exactitude, Charles McCall and Eric Hipolito, Jr., in “Emeralds” from Jewels, while Jahna Frantziskonis sparkled with quicksilver precision and pertness in Jewels’ “Rubies.” She is one with great promise it is hard to lose.

The atmosphere of Nacho Duato’s Rassemblement is one of sadness and longing, of a culture in development from an earlier one lost. In their pas de deux from it, Gaines and Elizabeth Murphy brought out the emotions, the yearning, in strong performances which were another highlight of the evening.

As has become the custom, each retiree received a bouquet of flowers at the end of their performance. Gaines received several from a half-dozen family, friends and company members who presented them one by one onstage, showing, as did the audience, their affection for this fine dancer and human being.

At the end of Serenade, Körbes was honored by bouquet after bouquet, from designers and ballet masters, from friends, colleagues and conductors, hugging everyone, and eventually giving her bouquets to her co-principal dancers as they stood with the company behind her applauding. Confetti  showered down [In fact those were rose petals, we’re told—ed.] on her from the flies and more flowers were tossed from the audience, as she took bow after bow. The audience stood and cheered her throughout in an emotional end to an evening of satisfying dance as well as goodbyes.

To tide you over, PNB offers a preview of their upcoming season.

A Whirlwind of Noodles and More in Xi’an, China

The symbolic Bell Tower of Xi’an (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
The symbolic Bell Tower of Xi’an (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)

How much do I love biang-biang noodles? So much that beyond writing extensively about them here in the past, I found myself planning a trip to Tokyo and thinking, “I’ll be pretty close to Xi’an (home of the noodles), so I should go.” I learned that China now waives the visa requirement for stays up to 72 hours, which I figured would be the perfect amount of time to experience the food scene there. (Not surprisingly, turns out I would have appreciated more time.)

I’d have to maximize my brief time in Xi’an, so I ambitiously scheduled a 6:00pm food tour to follow my scheduled landing at 4:30pm, with the airport an hour from the city. I was the first off the plane and to passport control, but as I anticipated from my research, the visa waiver scenario (it’s a bit complicated) took about 20 minutes to reconcile.

Now on to airport transportation: I’d heard nightmares about hiring a taxi, with drivers taking foreigners for a ride at ridiculously high prices and dumping them on the highway (unverified reports) for lack of funds. Out of concern for my sanity and well-being, my hotel arranged for a private car to pick me up. Thank you, Hilton Xi’an, for both that and the media discount for my stay! (Hotel photos at the end of this post.)

With no more than a “ni hao,” the driver took me on a 10-minute walk to his car. Tracking progress on Google Maps (which I was able to use—along with Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram—on my phone, but not my laptop) while fearing for my life upon suddenly remembering driving habits in China, I realized I’d get to the hotel just two minutes past the tour start time. I WeChat-ted my tour guide, got to the hotel, threw my bags in the room, and then greeted my guide as she got to the lobby.

Lost Plate Tours’ tuk-tuk
Lost Plate Tours’ tuk-tuk

Lost Plate Tours would provide a perfect introduction to a mysterious new city. I’m generally skeptical of food tours, but not knowing Xi’an and not knowing the language, this was a great way to spend the first night, getting slightly acclimated and getting fully stuffed with food I would not likely have found on my own. Lost Plate founders Ruixi Hu and Brian Bergey invited me as a guest on both the Evening Tour and the following day’s Morning Tour, and then generously spent a little extra time with me for a few extra bites.

Ruixi runs the tours, having moved recently from Chengdu to Xi’an. A true food lover, she ate her way around the city to pick out the best places to show off the regional cuisine. The tours are unique in that tuk-tuks are the transportation (they’ll pick you up at your hotel if within the city wall), racing through the back alleys to reach places where the locals eat. (The tuk-tuks are an exhilarating part of the experience, though perhaps not ideal for the faint-hearted or claustrophobic, as the space can be tight). I was impressed not only with how well-organized the tours are, but also the communication process leading up to and throughout the tours. Ruixi speaks English well, providing information about the food and food establishments, and answering other questions about Xi’an. And both she and Brian are incredibly friendly.

Taken from one of the stops during the Lost Plate evening tour
Taken from one of the stops during the Lost Plate evening tour

My Evening Tour made stops to visit a shao bing shop (one of my favorite bites of the night), a skewer-griller, a dumpling restaurant, a place for porridges, and an eatery serving bowls of spinach noodles—all before final festivities at a local brewery.

Tofu skin pulled out of fiery broth for shao bing
Tofu skin pulled out of fiery broth for shao bing
Your shao bing can be filled with a full choice of ingredients, like peanuts, potatoes, seaweed, and jellyfish, for a variety of flavors and textures. There’s even a whole boiled egg inside! (It’s amazing to see how they bake the bread on the inside roof of the furnace.)
Your shao bing can be filled with a full choice of ingredients, like peanuts, potatoes, seaweed, and jellyfish, for a variety of flavors and textures. There’s even a whole boiled egg inside! (It’s amazing to see how they bake the bread on the inside roof of the furnace.)
Grilling beef skewers on a fairly quiet street in the Muslim Quarter
Grilling beef skewers on a fairly quiet street in the Muslim Quarter
Finished beef skewers eaten with bread (the small pieces of beef are tastier than the large ones found in the tourist area)
Finished beef skewers eaten with bread (the small pieces of beef are tastier than the large ones found in the tourist area)
Xi’an-style soup dumplings (zheng jiao) filled with beef, spring onions, and onions
Xi’an-style soup dumplings (zheng jiao) filled with beef, spring onions, and onions
Spinach noodles topped with meat, chili, tomato-egg, cabbage, and sliced potatoes
Spinach noodles topped with meat, chili, tomato-egg, cabbage, and sliced potatoes
Garlic is often on the table, as they like to nibble it raw in Xi’an while eating noodles
Garlic is often on the table, as they like to nibble it raw in Xi’an while eating noodles

The next day’s Morning Tour was less formal than usual, as there was just one other guest—a colleague of Brian. We enjoyed a walk through the fascinating Xi Chang Market (also known as the Bird and Flower Market, held Thursdays and Sundays), where one can buy all kinds of food, along with birds, turtles, crickets and cricket “houses,” household products, possibly illegal teeth, “illegal” sexual products, and much more.

Market scene: fruit
Market scene: fruit
Meditating over watermelons?
Meditating over watermelons?
Men with their birds
Men with their birds
Listening intently, to purchase the right cricket
Listening intently, to purchase the right cricket
Or maybe you want a dog?
Or maybe you want a dog?
A colorful frog?
A colorful frog?
A turtle?
A turtle?
Ruixi helps tour guest Ellen with a duckling
Ruixi helps tour guest Ellen with a duckling
This (including taro) looks better than…
This (including taro) looks better than…
…this
…this
You can find just about anything at the market
You can find just about anything at the market

Breakfast-turned-lunch would be fried beef pancakes, spicy and numbing soup, sour soup dumplings and (finally) my beloved biang-biang noodles (though not the hot oil-seared version that I like best)—including a little “hands-on” lesson in making them. Ruixi, Brian, and I would then go on to try a couple of “hardcore” dishes (they have a nice write-up of these and others at the Lost Plate Tours website): goat blood with silk noodles, along with bang-bang meat.

Check out how they make the pancakes:

Fried beef pancake production
Fried beef pancake production
Finished product: fried beef pancake
Finished product: fried beef pancake
People line up (some with large “canteens” for to-go orders) to get ma la (numbing spicy) soup
People line up (some with large “canteens” for to-go orders) to get ma la (numbing spicy) soup
Ma la soup, after cilantro and chili oil added
Ma la soup, after cilantro and chili oil added
Ruixi, Brian, and Ellen breaking “flat bread” for bowls of ma la soup (yes, that’s the comfortable outdoor seating!)
Ruixi, Brian, and Ellen breaking “flat bread” for bowls of ma la soup (yes, that’s the comfortable outdoor seating!)
Older man with ma la soup walking past kids in the alley
Older man with ma la soup walking past kids in the alley
Making dumplings
Making dumplings
Sour soup dumplings
Sour soup dumplings
Making biang-biang noodles
Making biang-biang noodles
Cooking up the noodles
Cooking up the noodles
Slightly soupy version of biang-biang noodles
Slightly soupy version of biang-biang noodles
Goat blood with silk noodles soup (the noodles are apparently made from bean powder)
Goat blood with silk noodles soup (the noodles are apparently made from bean powder)
Basically all the parts of the animal are in this selection of “bang bang meat” (wood and tea leaf-smoked pork)
Basically all the parts of the animal are in this selection of “bang bang meat” (wood and tea leaf-smoked pork)
Plate of bang bang meat (tail, intestines, stomach, and more)
Plate of bang bang meat (tail, intestines, stomach, and more)

Absolutely stuffed, I’d have little time to recover before venturing out for the evening. On my own, I had to do what everyone does when visiting Xi’an: stroll the Muslim Quarter. It’s colorful and festive and full of amazing sights, smells, and sounds. Cooking fires flare, the scent of cumin pervades the air, cleavers meet meat on well-worn cutting boards, stuff on sticks make you ask “What is it?,” and young men (predominantly) perform acrobatic acts in stretching sugar and then pounding it into candy. And all that’s just your first minute into the market street.

South entry to the main market street of the Muslim Quarter (note the pail full of skewers!)
South entry to the main market street of the Muslim Quarter (note the pail full of skewers!)

Stomach full, I sampled judiciously, my favorite bite being some spicy fried potatoes. I negotiated a half-portion from the vendor while a young woman watched to see my reaction. “Tasty?” I smiled my answer, offering her a sample, and in exchange she gave me some of her spicy tofu. A reminder that food brings cultures and people together.

Here’s a short video clip showing how to make the potatoes:

Spicy potatoes
Spicy potatoes
Meat and more on skewers
Meat and more on skewers
Making roujiamo, or what some call a Xi’an burger, filled with beef or lamb (no pork in the Muslim Quarter, though I’m frankly confused about mutton, lamb, and goat, as they often use “mutton” for goat)
Making roujiamo, or what some call a Xi’an burger, filled with beef or lamb (no pork in the Muslim Quarter, though I’m frankly confused about mutton, lamb, and goat, as they often use “mutton” for goat)
Tofu vendor
Tofu vendor
Lots of things on sticks (and are those “rotatoes”?)
Lots of things on sticks (and are those “rotatoes”?)
Sheep hooves
Sheep hooves
All kinds of interesting breads, many naan-like
All kinds of interesting breads, many naan-like
Rice cake (everything’s better on a skewer!) topped with sweetened dates
Rice cake (everything’s better on a skewer!) topped with sweetened dates
Ongoing clean-up in the streets
Ongoing clean-up in the streets

I thought about the co-mingling of cultures in Xi’an—China’s former capital and the eastern end of the Silk Road—as I strolled the side streets and back alleys of the Muslim Quarter. This is where I found the true charm of the district and the city as a whole. Away from the hustle and bustle, people walked a little slower and smiled a bit more upon eye contact. Until, of course, a bunch of bicycles, tuk-tuks, motorcycles, cars, and buses suddenly screamed by.

I eventually made my way back to the shadow of the Drum Tower, and to a place I’d eyed at the start of the evening: the biang-biang noodle shop. Here, at last, I could have a bowl of hot oil-seared noodles. But not before voyeuristically watching preparation of bowl-after-bowl, taking notes on the noodle-stretching and thwacking, as well as the rest of the process. Finally, I placed an order and voraciously attacked my noodles. A delicious way to end the day!

Now you can be a voyeur and check out the short clip of the noodle-making:

My bowl of hot oil-seared biang-biang noodles
My bowl of hot oil-seared biang-biang noodles
So many choices of noodles…if you understand
So many choices of noodles…if you understand
…and some completely mysterious menu items
…and some completely mysterious menu items

My final day would start early with an expedition to see the Terracotta Army (aka Terracotta Warriors and Horses). It’s the obligatory thing to do when visiting Xi’an, but I eschewed the many organized trips, instead enjoying the adventure of being the only non-Chinese person on the #5 (306) bus. Many students take this cheap (about $1) bus to a university stop, but I took it to the end (about an hour) to the museum site.

Spectacular, right?
Spectacular, right?
Interesting pit views
Interesting pit views

The story about the discovery of the terracotta army (farmers were drilling a well) and the sight itself are both impressive, though as others have commented, in some ways magazine photos are more spectacular than the live view. As I anticipated, while I tried to appreciate the museum, my mind wandered to what bowl of noodles I would eat next. (And given the $25 entry fee, would it have instead been more satisfying to sample about 10 bowls of noodles?)

With a commitment back in town, I didn’t stay long, but still managed to sample a couple of bowls of noodles near the museum entrance. Perhaps defying some Chinese custom about hot and cold, I alternated between spicy slurps of goat blood with silk noodle soup and cooling bites of liangpi.

Another bowl of goat blood with silk noodles soup
Another bowl of goat blood with silk noodles soup
Liangpi, which can be made with rice flour or wheat flour
Liangpi, which can be made with rice flour or wheat flour

Then it was back to the hotel. As part of my stay, the Hilton offered a tasting of dishes at its China Club restaurant, as well as a hands-on lesson in making biang-biang noodles. I’m not normally a fan of hotel restaurants, but in eating a lot of street food, this would provide a contrasting (and, yes, a more comfortable) experience. Besides, China Club is not a typical hotel restaurant, as it has an extensive menu meant to appeal not only to hotel guests, but to locals who want to eat upscale versions of the local fare.

After quick introductions to the restaurant’s chefs (via translation), I was told to suit up for my biang-biang noodle lesson. Things moved quickly in the kitchen, and some details were lost in translation, but it seems like the dough recipe I’ve been using at home is spot-on, with the rest of the cooking process and preparation pretty much the same. What I’m not sure about is the flour for the dough. All I could learn is that they use a high-gluten flour (as do I), but their dough is far more stretchy than mine. It’s easier to work with, and creates silkier noodles.

Yours truly, reporting for duty at the Hilton Xi’an kitchen
Yours truly, reporting for duty at the Hilton Xi’an kitchen

Retiring to the dining room, I ate two different bowls of biang-biang noodles, as well as a sampling of other dishes (including more liangpi)—all fantastic. Again stuffed, they invited me back that evening to sample their version of Xi’an’s famous yang rou pao mo (crumbled flatbread in mutton stew). But not before a final evening walk through the city, including a stop at a department store to buy the one souvenir of my stay in Xi’an: a dowel-like rolling pin that I learned is a key to making better biang-biang noodles.

Here’s how the Hilton Xi’an makes biang-biang noodles:

The bowl of biang-biang noodles I helped to make, with various toppings (meat, tomatoes, Chinese chives)
The bowl of biang-biang noodles I helped to make, with various toppings (meat, tomatoes, Chinese chives)
Stirring and then eating my noodles
Stirring and then eating my noodles
A bowl similar to the hot oil-seared biang-biang noodles I ate, though this one also has sea cucumber (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
A bowl similar to the hot oil-seared biang-biang noodles I ate, though this one also has sea cucumber (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Jin xian you ta, a traditional Xi’an snack of noodles and dipping sauce (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Jin xian you ta, a traditional Xi’an snack of noodles and dipping sauce (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Liangpi, pre-sauce pour
Liangpi, pre-sauce pour
Liangpi, ready to eat
Liangpi, ready to eat
Mai fan, made with finely cut garland chrysanthemum
Mai fan, made with finely cut garland chrysanthemum
Dining room at the China Club restaurant in the Hilton Xi’an (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Dining room at the China Club restaurant in the Hilton Xi’an (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Wall mural in the restaurant dining room (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Wall mural in the restaurant dining room (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Guest room (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Guest room (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Exterior of the hotel (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Exterior of the hotel (photo courtesy of Hilton Xi’an)
Inside the Hilton guest room, all the supplies one needs: noodles, wine, potato chips, and condoms
Inside the Hilton guest room, all the supplies one needs: noodles, wine, potato chips, and condoms
A pleasant street to stroll, close to the Hilton Xi’an
A pleasant street to stroll, close to the Hilton Xi’an
Gaming on the street
Gaming on the street

Your Live Music Bets for the Weekend of June 19 through June 21

Lena Simon fronts her touring band version of Kairos tonight at Chop Suey. (Photo: Tony Kay)
Lena Simon fronts her touring band version of Kairos tonight at Chop Suey. (Photo: Tony Kay)

After nearly a month of doing nothin’ but eating, breathing, and dreaming movies, it’s high damned time for me to take care of a serious live music itch. To belabor the metaphor, this weekend’s a Supermall-sized drugstore, and below you’ll find just a few of the dozens of brands of sonic itch-reliever at your disposal. Yeah, I’m reaching for metaphors, but I (and you) won’t have to reach far for a great music show. Or two. Or more.

Friday, June 19 (tonight!):

Kairos, Maiah Manser, Blush Cut @ Chop Suey. 21+. $10 at the door. Doors at 9:00 p.m.

You can hardly throw an empty coffee cup over your shoulder in Seattle without hitting multi-instrumentalist/singer Lena Simon, who plays with garage-surf goddess collective La Luz, groove-rock dynamos Thunderpussy, and dance band Pollens. In Kairos, her solo project, Simon wraps her coolly alluring croon in gauzy synths, textured guitars, and a percolating bed of electronic and live percussion. Some of it’s insidiously danceable, some of it’s as dreamily pretty as anything you’ll hear, and all of it’s, well, amazing (see Chris Burlingame’s great, in-depth interview with Simon on this here website for more).

Tomten, Rare Diagram, Boat Race Weekend, Hellbat @ The Blue Moon Tavern. 21+. $5 at the door. Doors at 8:00 p.m., show at 9:00 p.m.

This bill at the U district’s venerable Blue Moon runs roughshod all over the map. Hellbat‘s unusual configuration (bass, keyboard, drums, and wonderfully alien-chirp vocals) and joyously trashy art-punk sound never neglects the fun factor, while Boat Race Weekend plays chunky and careening indie rock that borders on nu-metal. Portland’s Rare Diagram and local boys Tomten both round out the evening on a lush pop note: The former updates Pet Sounds-era Beach Boys and Harry Nilsson with 21st century oddness, and the latter put out one of my favorite local releases last yearThe Farewell Party, an unerringly gorgeous and lilting collection of baroque pop tunes that translate faultlessly in a live setting.

Cockney Rejects, Angry Samoans, 13 Scars, guests @ El Corazon. 21+. $15 at the door. Show at 8:30 p.m.

Looking for a fix of old-school punk from both sides of the pond? Look no further than El Corazon this evening. Cockney Rejects sprouted from English punk’s restless late1970s loins, bashing out a blue-collar variety of punk that owed as much to traditional pub-rock as it did to the spiky-haired three-chord bursts of their peers. California’s Angry Samoans, meanwhile, represented the funnier, less-angry flipside: Their two-minute epics sport a snarky sense of humor and a streak of garage-rock seasoning to go with the ripsaw energy–it’s genetically impossible for me not to appreciate a band sporting song titles like “They Saved Hitler’s Cock” and “You Stupid Asshole.”

Saturday, June 20:

De La Soul, Brothers from Another @ EMP Museum. 21+. $25 members/$30 non-members advance. Show at 9:00 p.m.

For a couple of months last winter, De La Soul’s 3 Feet High and Rising maintained virtually exclusive residence on my iPhone. Its psychedelic playfulness, densely intricate samples, and wonderfully out-there sense of humor informed an entire New York contingent of outside-the-box hip hop (A Tribe Called Qwest, Queen Latifah, The Jungle Brothers), Outkast,  local acts like THEESatisfaction and Shabazz Palaces, and  current hip-hop It Boy Joey Bada$$ (who, coincidentally, plays across town at the Showbox tomorrow night). 3 Feet showed hip hop to be as infinitely expansive as any other sub-genre of popular music, and damned if the record doesn’t still sound daisy-fresh today (their two Prince Paul-produced follow-ups, De La Soul is Dead and Buhloone Mindstate, kinda rule, too). Show up to pay some respects, and congratulate ’em for successfully funding their first new record in over a decade.  Make sure you get there early, too: Seattle three-man crew Brothers from Another share De La’s propensity for bluster-free, fun rhymes–albeit with a less-trippy backdrop of minimal funk beats–and a reputedly-jumping onstage presence.

The Draft Punk Festival with Girl Trouble, The Fucking Eagles, The DT’s, The Tom Price Desert Classic, and loads more @ The Swiss Restaurant and Pub (Tacoma). All ages. Free until 8:00 p.m/$10 after 8:00 p.m.  Show begins at noon.

Great, no-bull garage rock crawls from the soil of Tacoma like some undying monster, so it’s worth considering a trip to T-Town for this free-for-most-of-the-day music festival. You’ll get local craft brews, a lovable 1913-vintage venue for the paid evening portion of the fest, and a dozen local rock outfits. There doesn’t appear to be a weak act in the batch, but make it a point to catch two of The City of Destiny’s most durable bands. Girl Trouble are Tacoma’s Garage Rock of Gibraltar (they’ve been carrying the torch  for over thirty years now), and The Fucking Eagles thrust some roadhouse soul muscle into their muscular garage rock. Both acts belong on anyone’s local-rock bucket list of live bands.

Eldridge Gravy and the Court Supreme, Trolls Cottage, guests @ Nectar Lounge. 21+. Free. Show begins at 10:00 a.m.

Eldridge Gravy and his band of funky misfits the Court Supreme remain one of this ‘burg’s most reliable purveyors of deeply booty-shaking soul, so they’ll fit right in amidst the parades and naked hippie cyclists that’ll be overtaking Fremont during the Solstice Festival this weekend. Expect the likely-warm temperatures to increase by at least ten degrees once these guys get down to business. For reals, cousin.

Sunday, June 21:

Charms, Eight Bells, X Suns, Panther Attack @ Narwhal. 21+. Free (I think). Show at 9:00 p.m.

I haven’t been to Narwhal (AKA the basement of Capitol Hill’s Unicorn bar) for live music yet, but this bill could change that, largely on the strength of Seattle band Charms‘ reputation as a potent onstage act. Their frantic music throws rapidly-strummed guitars and perpetually rolling drums into indie rock tunes that sound sort of like a super-caffeinated Modest Mouse gone new wave. It’s quite the contrast to the other three bands on the bill (Eight Bells from Portland and Seattle ensembles X Suns and Panther Attack), all of whom proffer largely/fully instrumental, complex-yet-heavy space-rock sonics in the spirit of Earth and early Kinski.

Curious Georges in a conversation with Seattle