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SIFF 2015: Festival Roundtable (Week Three)

We’re hitting the final days of the marathon that is SIFF 2015, and despite divergence in tastes, the viewing lists of ye olde SunBreakers  have overlapped more than once.

Marco Collins, the Glamour and the Squalor
Marco Collins, the Glamour and the Squalor

Chris: One movie that it looks like we have some unanimity is The Glamour and the Squalorthe documentary about Seattle’s legendary radio figure Marco Collins. Tony wrote this excellent review here, and Josh registered his approval on Twitter, and I hope he expands on it here.

Collins, for the uninitiated, became a DJ at KNDD, Seattle’s first “alternative rock” radio station in 1991, just before “grunge” had its moment. Collins wasn’t a passive figure, though, and was often the first person, or the most enthusiastic, to play a lot of music that has been iconic before it became a fixture in our soundtracks (Nirvana, Beck, Weezer’s “Undone (The Sweater Song)”). And he did it within the corporate radio constraints. Kinda. There’s a very funny moment in the film where Collins is playing Pearl Jam’s Vitalogy on the air well before it was it was authorized. He played it after 5 on a Friday so that Monday morning was the earliest Epic Records’ lawyers could stop him. Something similar happened when a band he worked with (who also worked with producer Steve Albini) got an unfinished copy of Nirvana’s In Utero album.

I can’t claim any real critical distance here, but I went into the screening with some apprehension because I’ve known Marco Collins through the music scene over the last several years (not closely but he was more than kind to me on numerous occasions). I always found him to be a David Carr-like figure: a big-hearted luminary who publicly wrestled with his own demons but was also generous and supportive of younger bands and people who operate inside of the Seattle music scene. When he had a brief tenure a few years ago with the great – but ill-fated – online radio station Jet City Stream, he invited me to be on with him one time, though logistics kept it from happening (mostly inflexibility with my day job). I’m quite camera-shy and used to stutter terribly so I don’t think it would have made for “great radio,” and could have proven to be a disaster, but that invitation meant the world to me. It still does.

I’m glad that side of Marco Collins came through in the movie and it didn’t build its entire narrative around myth-making and Collins’ battles with addiction, though it would be understandable if it did.

Tony: I think we all enjoyed this a lot. I was struck that Collins’ eagerness to hear and tout new sounds remains genuine and undiminished after three decades; and I like that he really opens up about his various issues without the movie descending into bathos (kudos to director Marq Evans on that front). You get a fascinating peek by proxy into the evolution of music consumption over the last three decades, too.

Josh: I found all of the pieces about the changing modes of music consumption to be fascinating. The clever mix of archival and what I suspect to be cleverly ‘faked’ old footage of Seattle paints a picture of a town so far removed from the mainstream cultural conversation before Collins re-launched 107.7 as “the End” that I would’ve loved to hear more about exactly how it was that a Seattle radio station in the early 1990s ever became influential at all!   I imagine that a whole sequel could be made just about the shifting landscapes of the airwaves (this movie had nary a mention of listener-powered KEXP or other highly influential, non-commercial, cultural ‘curators’).

But ultimately, that wasn’t the movie and I can accept that digging into technicalities would’ve dragged down the fascinating story of the guy at the center of this revolution. I thought that it was very much to Evans’s credit that he didn’t even try to tie everything up into a neat “happy ending”. Doing so would have been tempting — and there were certainly marks along the way like the passage of Referendum 74, a reconciliation with his father, and that pawn shop search for a lost piece of beloved memorabilia that could’ve been inflated into a triumphant freeze frame finish. But instead, he made the much more honest and inspiring choice to close just as Marco’s seemed to be at a place of hopeful uncertainty, acknowledging that his story remains very much a work-in-progress. This was by far the rowdiest and most appreciative crowd that I’ve encountered at any SIFF screening this year and the standing ovation before the Q&A demonstrates just how many friends Collins still has in this town, all of whom are rooting for his next act to be even more successful.  (4.5★)

The Primary Instinct
The Primary Instinct

Chris: Another movie that I enjoyed for similar reasons was The Primary Instinctthe concert documentary about character actor/podcaster Stephen Tobolowsky. The Tobolowsky Files has become a hit because of his personal stories of being “oh yeah, that guy” in something like 200 movies and TV shows. The movie is a recording of a show he put on at the Moore Theatre.

Tobolowsky frames the performance around a kid from Bellevue asking him at a previous show why he tells stories, and for a brief moment, I was worried that he would have quoted Joan Didion, like way too many amateur personal essays I’ve read, saying “We tell ourselves stories in order to live.” Thankfully, he didn’t. Instead gave a very thoughtful, and long answer.

But the movie was very sweet and affecting. I found that I really loved hearing Tobolowsky tell about his personal and Hollywood stories. I’d like to do more of that, and I know where to find his podcast.

At the screening I went to, there was one very funny moment I want to share. During the Q&A, someone asked Tobolowsky what advice he’d give to his younger self (I know). Director David Chen interrupted Tobolowsky’s answer by saying “Not appear in Atlas Shrugged 3.” He had to repeat and explain his joke because some people missed it (probably a majority), but I got it the first time and it was hilarious.

Josh: Yes, an incredible perk of making a “concert film” about an incredible storyteller is that you’re almost guaranteed to get great answers regardless of the question! I really didn’t know much about the movie going in — Chen has been plugging it on the Game of Thrones Podcast he co-hosts for weeks and the timing was convenient to my schedule — so it took me a little bit to adjust to the fact that most of the running time was a single performance and not a typical documentary structure. Without knocking the heart of the film itself (which you’ve already sold convincingly), I think that my favorite parts of The Primary Instinct were probably the candid “Hollywood Stories” endcaps and the post-film discussion that illuminated how the film, live performances, and podcasts came into existence. I kind of wish that some of that backstory had made it onto the screen, but still thought that it was very nicely done. (4★)

H
H

Tony: One of the most pleasant surprises for me this last week was H., a US/Argentinian co-production that welds indie character study with end-of-days/science fiction unease. The Stranger hated it for the reasons I loved it: It’s an odd, slow burn of a film that doesn’t lay out its cards all at once. What starts out feeling like an indie drama gradually gives way to a truly creepy sense of mounting dread, as the town of Troy, NY experiences a bunch of wiggy shit that may or may not have been triggered by a meteor shower.  Any further elaboration would spoil some of the movie’s carefully-crafted disorientation. No, it doesn’t always make literal sense, but guess what? Most nightmares don’t, and pound for pound,  H. chilled me more than anything I’ve seen at SIFF 2015.

Phoenix
Phoenix

Josh: I had pretty good luck this week, too. In one of the biggest standouts, Nina Hoss gives an breathtaking performance in Phoenix as a concentration camp survivor who returns to Berlin with a new face. Upon her recovery from extensive facial reconstruction, the former singer explores the rebuilding city’s nightlife where she encounters her husband who no longer recognizes her.  Explaining the schemes and ensuing revelations here, though, might rob viewers of some of the film’s greatest treats. Instead, I’ll just say that this has a place near the top of my list and kept me guessing until the last note.  (5★)

On the other hand, I was grateful for having read “spoilers” about the ultimate resolution Lamb. Even having a sense of where it was (or wasn’t) going, of the film, nothing was quite as uncomfortable to watch. An exceptionally well done film with lots of local connections, this adaptation finds actor/director Ross Partridge somewhat inexplicably befriending an eleven-year-old girl (stunningly great Oona Laurence) and convincing her to take an illicit, if beautifully photographed, road trip to a remote Wyoming cabin. I still haven’t untangled my feelings about it, but am glad that I saw it, with ‘spoilers/reassurances’ in hand. (4.5★)

Saved From the Flames
Saved From the Flames

Tony: SIFF’s definitely delivered on the reissue/archival front this year, but the crown jewel of archival presentations, hands down, was Saved from the Flames, which gathered vintage films rescued from nitrate disintegration into one lively, eye-opening, and extremely entertaining compilation. Deftly hosted by historian Serge Bromberg (who also accompanied some of the films on piano), it showcased a restored print of A Trip to the Moon (the first great sci-fi film), some haunting 1906 footage of San Francisco pre-and-post earthquake (the first great documentary?), Buster Keaton’s last silent short (1923’s The Love Nest), and lots more. Anyone who assumes that old and/or silent films can’t be as funny, dazzling, and relevant as anything on a screen today woulda had that canard blown out of the water.

Josh: On the topic of old movies, somehow, my only documentary of the week was Chuck Norris vs. Communism, the improbable story of how hundreds of VHS tapes of Western films made it under the Communist radar and into private home-based screenings in 1980s Romania. The smuggled tapes were almost entirely dubbed by one woman, whose tireless simultaneous translations were fueled almost entirely by an obsession with getting to see these contraband films before anyone else. Interspersed between clips campy and cinematically classic, the documentary also included lots of recollections from a wide range of people who illicitly watched the tapes whose role (if any) in contemporary Romanian society was not clear to me (they might, however, be familiar faces to the HBO Europe audience). Overall, even as their stories became somewhat repetitive, I remained fascinating about how even inadvertently these Hollywood films communicated capitalist values: from the immense wealth that they brought to the kingpin at the top of the pyramid smuggling scheme, to the extra cash earned by the people who hosted video nights, to the not-entirely-accurate vision of opulent Western live that they presented to viewers.  (4★)

Don't Think I've Forgotten ...
Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten …

Tony: My winning streak of docs continued unabated these last seven days. Being Evel, a loving biopic about 1970s icon and photo-extreme sports pioneer Evel Knievel, hit all the right notes, capturing the excitement of Knievel’s daredevilry while still acknowledging the very dark streak threading through the guy’s character. I’d completely forgotten how utterly huge a figure Knievel was back in the day, and this movie chronicles the evolution of his superstardom solidly.

I also enjoyed Colin Hanks’ All Things Must Pass, a solid doc chronicling the rise and fall of Tower Records, formerly the largest record store chain in the world. It’ll definitely play more compellingly to folks who actually combed a Tower outlet (count me in on that group), but it also finds some drama and humor in the ragtag bunch that created and ran the chain in its halcyon days.

I’m still trying to figure out whether my extreme fondness for two more documentaries, The Black Panthers: Vanguards of the Revolution and Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten: Cambodia’s Lost Rock and Roll, is due to the excellence of the filmmaking, or the inherently riveting subjects. Either way, both of these maintained SIFF 2015’s high doc standards. The former covers the evolution of the Panthers’ movement with an immediacy that makes it one of the most vital history lessons I’ve ever gotten. Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten, meantime, explores Cambodia’s flourishing rock and roll scene in the 1960’s and ’70s–and how the harrowing shrapnel of the Khmer Rouge regime hurt and killed so many of its players.

The End of the Tour

Josh: More of a historical re-creation than a documentary, seeing Jason Segel re-animating David Foster Wallace in The End of the Tour stirred far more feelings that I expected. Infinite Jest is unquestionably one of the most influential novels in my own personal literary canon, but despite having read it soon after its publication, impractically dragging the giant trade paperback along on a college road trip, I have few contemporary memories of actually seeing Wallace beyond the bandana book jacket photos. So, I don’t know how accurate Segel’s performance was, but it felt chillingly accurate and entirely non-parodic. Getting to see this big, sad, anxious, obsessive, image-conscious, dog-loving human interfacing with David Lipsky (maybe someday Eisenberg will get to play a character who’s totally secure and not beset by low-level competitive jealousy, but for now he’s among the best we have) on a long car trip was a real gift. There’s not a huge amount of plot, but their rich underlying dynamics of their conversations — both have much to gain and lose from the experience — is more than enough to carry the film. The film also makes 1996 seem like the ancient past and, like Almost Famous, contributes to the portrayal of Rolling Stone reporters as perpetually less cool than their subjects. In a strange convergence, like another SIFF favorite Me and Earl and the Dying Girl the movie makes incredible, if emotionally devastating, use of Brian Eno’s  “the Big Ship” in a key moment. (5★)

Tony: I’m right with you on End of the Tour, Josh. This unlikely buddy story between journalist David Lipsky and doomed literary giant David Foster Wallace deftly created an odd but winning buddy story with emotional ebbs and flows that never once missed a beat. And Jason Segel’s portrayal of Wallace is rendered with casual, unforced brilliance. If it wasn’t so subtle and fine-tuned, I’d pick his work as a shoo-in for an Oscar nod.

Josh: Given the author, it’s impossible to resist adding just one endnote:  I found it borderline bizarre that there was no mention or explanation for why the their epic interview never saw publication until after Wallace’s 2008 suicide.  Lipsky later published it as a stand-alone book (on which the film is based) in 2010.

Güeros (the stills are widescreen, the film isn't)
Güeros (the stills are widescreen, the film isn’t)

And, I suppose, while we’re getting metafictional and postmodern, it’s as good a time as any to mention Güeros, an aggressively cinematic and self-aware Mexican film, set in 1999 but filmed like the French New Wave. It picks up as a teen from Veracruz is sent to live with his collegiate brother in the middle of the student strikes and follows them on an journey through various locales and cultures in search of a dying rock legend. Director Alonso Ruiz Palacios has a fantastic eye: the movie is more a series of funny interlinked moments that occasionally drift into magic realism, but they’re so dazzlingly filmed in stunning black and white Academy ratio that nearly every dreamy shot would be suitable for framing. (5★)

Chatty Catties
Chatty Catties

Tony: OK, confession time: I saw the Talking Cat movie, and I liked it. A lot. Chatty Catties posits a universe in which housecats communicate telepathically with their people (no, the movie doesn’t explain why). It’s as much a take on the inherent dysfunction of human-to-human relationships as it is about talking cats, but director Pablo Valencia nonetheless gets a huge amount of comic mileage out of his high-concept setup. Hard-of-hearing and deaf performers voice the tabbies, a conceit that likely flirts with political correctness for some. But the voice artists–especially John Autry II as lead cat Leonard–sport terrific comic timing, and there’s a surplus of genuinely funny dialogue. I haven’t laughed this hard at a movie  in a long time.

I also went to the Studio 54 Experience party commemorating the screening of the Director’s Cut of 54. I had never seen the original theatrical cut, so I can’t speak for how much director Mark Christopher’s preferred version improves on it.  But one tagline that continually popped up in my head as I watched it was “Boogie Nights, with Nutri-Sweet”.  I appreciate and respect that this new cut makes this chronicle of the world’s most famous discoteque much gayer (and, by extension, more honest). Even with that in mind, though, 54 is neither fish nor fowl: It’s too earthbound to appeal to camp fans, but still too clumsily-executed to even begin to hold a candle to Boogie Nights (its obvious model).

MollyMoon_KeyArt

Chris: When I went into seeing Molly Moon and the Incredible Book of HypnotismI was hoping that Christopher N. Rowley’s movie would do something similar to local ice cream queen Molly Moon Netizel’s 2012 book of recipes like Charlie Kaufman did to Susan Orlean’s The Orchid Thiefbut that wasn’t the case! At all. I guess I should have actually read the film synopsis in the program catalog.

It’s ostensibly a “kids'” movie about a young orphan who finds a high-coveted book at the library and uses the lessons in the book to hypnotize her way into an opulent London hotel, pop stardom, and the heart of the cruel headmistress at her boarding house. Not necessarily in that order. For someone who treats Selfish, Shallow, and Self-Absorbed like it’s the bible, Molly Moon is actually quite delightful.

Tony:  I also really enjoyed Liza the Fox-Fairy, a gently surreal fantasy about a lonely young Hungarian woman convinced she’ll soon transform into a fox-headed spirit. Oh, and Liza’s good pals with the mischievous, sometimes homicidal ghost of a Japanese faux-Elvis pop singer, too. It’s definitely on the same tip as Delicatessen and Amelie, and while it doesn’t quite hit those films’ sustained brilliance, it’s still genuinely charming and clever without feeling like it’s straining to do so.

Mr Holmes
Mr Holmes

Josh: Perhaps primed by a couple of masterful seasons (serieses?) of Benedict Cumberbatch as Mark Gatiss’s modern Sherlock, my excitement about seeing Ian McKellan as Mr. Holmes ran pretty high. In Bill Condon’s hands, we find the the title detective doddering, struggling with dementia, and with a precocious child instead of dear old Watson. This often sappy eldercare take, combined with a permanently angry Laura Linney (perhaps infuriated with being stuck with an inconsistent accent and unclear motivations) unfortunately diminished the fun that I was hoping to find in this latest re-interpretation. (2.5★)

Chris: Josh, I register your complaints about Bill Condon’s Mr. Holmesbut I disagree a little. I thought despite the film centering around Sherlock Holmes being 93 years old and suffering from dementia, it had a lot of subtle humor and found the precocious child having such an interest in Holmes’s stories quite fun. While Ian McKellen’s Sherlock Holmes is aging and his body and mind aren’t working the way it used to, I never found him to be pitiable.

Tony:  Finally, The Fire is an Argentinian relationship drama about a couple attempting to rent a new apartment, only to have the seller delay the transaction for one day.  The added time, as it turns out, only amplifies the already-extant tension between the pair. The movie’s anchored by two terrific central performances by Pilar Gamboa and Juan Barberini, and it burns brightest (sorry) when it hones in most tightly on their awkward, sometimes violently passionate, and queasily genuine interactions with each other.

Virgin Mountain
Virgin Mountain

Josh: For me, Elephant Song was a movie that hung together mostly on performances. In it, Xavier Dolan is a wily pachyderm-obsessed psych patient who’s dominates a quid pro quo session with a psychiatrist (Bruce Greenwood) who’s trying to solve the mystery of a disappearing colleague. Despite being adapted from a play, the film rarely feels ‘stagey’, making great use of camerawork and richly appointed sets to feel well suited to the big screen throughout.  (4★)

In contrast to the doctor-patient fireworks above, Virgin Mountain (Fusi), is a much quieter yet very effective bit of character work centered on the small victories and unjust defeats of a fortysomething who still lives with his mother and is bullied by the jerks at work. Being pushed out of his homebound life of World War II reconstructions and into line dancing lessons by his mother’s new boyfriend (who wants some time at home alone) changes some things but not others. As only a native would do, Dagur Kári’s new film about a gentle giant shows off much of the Icelandic character, little of its scenery. (4★)

 

We have just the weekend left to soak up the SIFF. Keep track of the SunBreak’s SIFF coverage on our SIFF 2015 page, plus news updates and micro-reviews on Twitter @theSunBreak.

SIFF 2015: Picks for Week One (May 18-21)

sunbreak_siff_watching

No surprise, SIFF ’15 blazes forward with a stacked roster that’ll make you rue working at all this week. Below are our picks for the best stuff to see before Memorial Day Weekend descends.

Josh’s picks:

SonOfTheSheik_KeyArt

The Son of the Sheik  Cambridge’s Alloy Orchestra — a three-man band consisting of percussionists Terry Donahue and Ken Winokur and former Mission of Burma guitarist Roger Miller — will be performing a new score alongside a restored print of George Fitzmaurice’s 1926 silent romance/adventure. Featuring Rudolph Valentino in his final role(s), the film  includes “moonlit rendezvous, knife fights, kidnapping, horseback racing, betrayal, and love” while the live performance promises  instruments native to the Middle East to match the dramatic desert setting. Events like this are one of the niftier features of the festival, making this one-night-only special engagement worth both a look and a listen.

    • May 19, 2015 SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival   7:00 PM

Bodyslam: Revenge of the Banana Of potential interest to fans of a very particular slice of  semi-recent Seattle dive bar burlesque history, this documentary profiles Seattle Semi-Pro Wrestling’s Ronald McFondle, Eddie Van Glam, and The Banana. Rowdy performances, internal strife, and parody wrestlers going all the way to the state capitol ensues. Directors Ryan Harvie, John Paul Hortsmann scheduled to attend to answer some, if not all, of your questions.

  • May 21, 2015 9:30 PM SIFF Cinema Egyptian

ListenToMeMarlon_KeyArtListen to Me Marlon Stevan Riley’s documentary about the life and times of Marlon Brando sounds absolutely mind-boggling. Fittingly the story is told in the actor’s own voice — via a stash of previously unreleased audio diary entries — and the usual bits of rare photographs and film footage is paired with a digitized 3D image of Brando’s head that the actor himself had crafted [!], making for a haunting post-mortem autobiography.

  • May 19, 2015 SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival 6:00 PM

OldDarkHouse_KeyArt

Tony’s picks:

The Old Dark House  Another rescue/restoration compliments of The Film Foundation, James Whale’s 1932 chiller showcases the director’s mordant streak of black humor, genuinely creepy atmosphere, and a terrific cast including scare king Boris Karloff, Ernest Thesiger, and Melvyn Douglas. Plus, you’ll get to see what Gloria Stuart, octogenarian Oscar nominee for Titanic, looked like as an ingenue (for the record, she was quite the dish).

  • May 18, 2015 7:00 PM SIFF Cinema Egyptian

Shrew’s Nest  Director Alex de la Iglesia’s been responsible for two of my favorite genre offerings from previous SIFFs (2011’s The Last Circus and 2014’s Witching and Bitching). He takes the producer’s desk for this thriller that’s been generating some serious word-of-mouth.

  • May 19, 2015 9:30 PM SIFF Cinema Egyptian
  • May 26, 2015 3:30 PM Lincoln Square

The Look of Silence  2013’s The Art of Killing  just might be the most mesmerizing documentary that’s screened at SIFF in the last five years (our SunBreak staff was left agog by it in one of our SIFF 2013 roundtables), so the notion of director Joshua Oppenheimer returning to Indonesia’s Killing Fields, this time with the relative of one of the massacre’s victims, can’t help but promise much the same level of emotional intensity and artistry.

  • May 21, 2015 9:30 PM Harvard Exit
  • May 23, 2015 1:00 PM SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival

Keep track of the SunBreak’s SIFF coverage on our SIFF 2015 page, plus news updates and micro-reviews on Twitter @theSunBreak.

SIFF 2015: Picks for Opening Weekend (May 15-17)

SIFF 2015

It’s finally (already?) here: the 41st Seattle International Film Festival,  in which we, as a city, embrace our fondness for popcorn and lines, hatred of sunlight and fresh air, and love of film in a twenty-five day marathon of movie-watching! As you prepare yourself for nearly a month of moviegoing, scour the SIFF website and refer to our timeless pro-tips

Josh: Opening Night represents the only day where the festival doesn’t force you to make difficult decisions between simultaneous filmgoing experiences: it’s either Spy and a fancy boozy party where some Seattleites will break the ice, converse with strangers, and just maybe get sugar buzzed enough to dance or a night at home watching the Scandal season finale and studying the SIFF program. We haven’t seen Spy yet, but Paul Feig’s (Bridesmaids ) C.I.A. comedy starring Melissa McCarthy, Jason Statham Jude Law, Rose Byrne, Miranda Hart, Bobby Cannavale, and Allison Janney made it out of SXSW with universal acclaim, which at least provides a sense of hope that you might spend the party rehashing hilarious moments (rather than tearing it apart like last year’s controversial Hendrixpic).

Tony: When it comes to the Opening Night film, I always try to keep an open mind. With the positive word on Spy, I’m hoping for Our Man in Havana quality, but bracing for Pink Panther (Steve Martin-era) stinkiness. Either way, there’ll be cocktails at the post-film fete to take any potential sting off. Oh, and Megan Griffiths gets the Mayor’s Award tonight, which is really cool.

Josh: As always, there are plenty of movie groupings by mood, genre, etc. Any categories that you’re particularly intrigued by?

Tony: One of the indisputable highlights of SIFF’s programming each year is the Fest’s bushel of reissues and restorations, and this year maintains SIFF’s strong RBA (Reissues Batting Average). Among the many intriguing offerings: Saved From the Flames (director Serge Bromberg’s compilation of rescued old reels, including a restored print of Georges Melies’ 1902 A Trip to the Moon); silent movie heartthrob Rudolph Valentino’s 1926 smash Son of the Sheik, scored by the Alloy Orchestra;  a triple feature of Satyajit Ray’s Apu Trilogy films in luminescent 4k digital restoration; and a screening of one of auteur Max Ophuls’ few American films, the 1949 film noir Caught.

Given my track record, it’ll likely surprise no one that I’m also extremely jazzed about SIFF’s Midnight Adrenaline and cult cinema picks for 2015. It’s hard to deny (for the right kind of freak) the allure of a heavy-metal demon-summoning New Zealand comedy with dildo fights (Deathgasm, playing tomorrow night’s Midnight Adrenaline slot at SIFF Egyptian), or a retro-futuristic BMX-bikesploitation action movie boasting gouts of blood and bad-assed character actor Michael Ironside (Turbo Kid). But there are also classier-sounding offerings like the locally-grown thriller The Hollow One and the Danish werewolf film When Animals Dream.

Josh:  I’m looking forward to a little bit of everything from the films I’m planning on seeing for Opening Weekend. I’ll probably browse around based on whims and word on the street, but these are a few at the top of my list:

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl. Anyone even tangentially paying attention to the buzz coming from the year’s Sundance will have probably at least heard about Alfonso Gomez-Rejon’s story of two socially inept teen dudes who make goofy movie parodies and their burgeoning relationship with a girl with leukemia. An audience and jury favorite, it also features Nick Offerman and Connie Britton alongside the teen actors. The director will be in attendance for Saturday’s screening, which will be followed by a party at the mall.

  • May 16, 2015 AMC Pacific Place 11 6:30 PM
  • May 17, 2015 SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival 2:30 PM

The New Girlfriend (Une Nouvelle Amie)François Ozon. Hitchcockian psychosexual drama. Romain Duris. Cross-dressing. That’s probably enough to let you know this one’s for you.

  • May 16, 2015 SIFF Cinema Egyptian 9:30 PM
  • May 17, 2015 SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival 11:30 AM

Results What’s that you say? A new Andrew Bujalski film is playing during SIFF’s opening weekend? Funny Ha Ha and Mutual Appreciation are so dear to my heart that I almost don’t need to know anything else before committing to a couple hours in the theater. When last we saw him, he’d swerved from being at the vanguard of mumblecore (a term I use with the utmost affection) comedies into the Twilight Zone of nerds and new agers intersecting in Computer Chess. With Results he’s working in color with actors whose names you’ll probably recognize on a love triangle amongst personal trainers and their slacker clients in Austin, Texas.

  • May 15, 2015 SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival 3:30 PM
  • May 16, 2015 SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival 9:00 PM

Love and Mercy. John Cusack and Paul Dano play Beach Boys singer Brian Wilson at different points in his career, with a score from Atticus Ross (scheduled to attend Friday’s screening),  a script from one of the writers of Todd Haynes’s chameleonic Dylan biopic I’m Not There, and direction from Bill Pohlad, whose otherwise accomplished biography also includes a mention of his father’s multi-decade ownership of the Minnesota Twins. I’m so there.

  • May 15, 2015 SIFF Cinema Egyptian 6:30 PM
  • May 16, 2015 AMC Pacific Place 11 12:30 PM
We're really stoked to see the Brian Wilson Biopic, Love and Mercy.
We’re really stoked to see the Brian Wilson Biopic, Love and Mercy.

Tony: You hit the nail on the head earlier, Josh: Most days, SIFF is a total Sophie’s Choice. I count at least 9 films over the weekend that I’m really aching to see (including the ones you mentioned). Here are three others that I think merit must-see status.  

The Red ShoesMichael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s 1948 fable about a ballerina pursuing stardom richly deserves its rep as one of the greatest films in the history of cinema. It’s a smart and knowing peek into the guts of a dance company, a fairy tale resonant with metaphor, and a visual feast so lushly colorful and gorgeous it’ll take your breath away. You’re nuts not to see it on the Egyptian’s huge screen.

  • May 16, 2015 12:30 PM SIFF Cinema Egyptian

The Hallow.  I’m really intrigued by Corin Hardy’s reputedly atmospheric chiller about an Irish family encountering a forest full of extremely scary things.

  • May 16, 2015 MIDNIGHT SIFF Cinema Egyptian
  • May 20, 2015 8:30 PM SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival

Personal Gold: An Underdog Story.   Directed with birds-eye immediacy by former Olympic kayaker (and Seattle native) Tamara Christopherson, this doc chronicles the struggles of the underfunded but scrappy US Women’s Track Cycling Team as they go for the Olympic Gold in the 2012 London Games. The inspiration feels genuine and hard-won, and it offers a fascinating peek at modern technology’s role in helping athletes achieve personal bests without  performance-enhancing drugs.

  • May 16, 2015 12:00 PM SIFF Cinema Uptown Festival
  • May 19, 2015 7:00 PM Pacific Place

Keep track of the SunBreak’s SIFF coverage in the coming weeks here, plus news updates and micro-reviews on Twitter @theSunBreak.